The old guard falls as new leaders rise: “The Sands of Change”

The Sands of Change

Part I

by Shanel Wilson

Hot air buffeted the hover as it sped through the dunes. Eglamour lifted his collar to protect his neck from the sand spray. He shut his eyes from the blazing sun, but the bright lights of the Polity’s Kite Night display flashed in his mind instead. Travels through the savagelands, especially by hover, were dangerous because of the beasts and bandits that lurked there. Eglamour forgot all about those threats today. A new, larger one threatened to dismantle the precious way of life he helped nourish in Westminster.

The uncertainty the Polity brought to the Globe rattled Eglamour to his core. He sunk deeper into his seat wishing the pilot would go faster.


Sebastian lounged with his feet on top of his father’s desk. His younger brother, Gonzalo, peered out the office window to the Smith below. To the left, glassmiths twirled molten glass at the end of their blowpipes, creating intricate and delicate designs. The right side was filled with grand annealing lehrs for the larger glassworks like the wall pieces ordered by Whitehall.

Hot air buffeted the hover as it sped through the dunes. Photo by Jeremy Bishop.

“We should have gone to meet the Polity instead of Father.” Gonzalo tapped his fingers against the glass.

“All in due time, Gonzalo. Let him savor these last few vestiges of power before we take our rightful place. With Emilia finally gone, Father will soon see his time is over.”

“You are right, as always big brother,” Gonzalo sighed. “But the Polity arriving could mean great things for Westminster. We need to make sure Father doesn’t ruin our chances.”

The office door opened and a slouching Eglamour shuffled into the room.

“Greetings, Father! Welcome home.” Sebastian jumped up from the chair to greet Eglamour.

“Yes, welcome home! What is the news from the Polity? We are so anxious to hear. There were distant lights in the sky coming from Whitehall. They must know how to throw a great party!” Gonzalo grinned.

“My sons, it was no party.” Eglamour sat at his desk wearily. “The captain the Polity sent, Captain Ward, she made it clear the Polity intentions here. We need to be cautious, especially if we want to keep our little desert haven the way it is.”

The brothers exchanged a curious look.

“I will explain more but first, has Emilia sent the comm she arrived in Whitehall yet?”

“There has been no word, Father,” Gonzalo said.

“I am sure there is nothing to worry about. Whitehall must be flooded with people. Comms are spotty as it is. Perhaps she had trouble finding a drone to send her message in the clamor of the rocket landing. I am sure she is fine.” Sebastian reassured his father, confidently patting him on the back.

Eglamour nodded at his eldest son.

Gonzalo tapped his fingers against the glass. Photo by Alexandra Gornago.

“You are probably right. I must go see Benedick to tell him what I learned. I trust everything has been running smoothly in my absence?”

“But of course. Smooth as glass, like you say, Father.” Sebastian winked.

“Thank you, Sebastian. You will do great things with the Smith when it is your time.”

“I’m glad you think so.” Sebastian smiled wryly, with a quick wink to his brother.

Eglamour rummaged through bits and bobs that littered the top of his desk. He paused to check the communication logs again. Seeing nothing had come through, he muttered to himself and kept shifting things from one spot to another.

“We’ll leave you to it, Father,” Sebastian said, tugging at Gonzalo’s sleeve.

“Yes, nice to have you back, Father.” Gonzalo closed the door behind him and Sebastian.

Eglamour, lost in his thoughts, failed to look up.


Soft, white curtains diffused light across the bedroom where Benedick was resting. A fit of coughs interrupted the relative quiet of the room. Benedick held his chest and laid back against his pillow when he heard a knock at the door.

“Come in,” Benedick managed to squeak out.

A young woman entered the room. Her hair was pulled into a neat braid that cascaded down the length of her back. She carried an elegant, glass water pitcher to the side table and filled Benedick’s glass.

“Uncle Benedick, Eglamour has come to tell you of the Polity landing. Should I show him in?”

“Please, my dear Imogen. Thank you for the drink.”

Imogen patted the back of his hand and left the room. Moments later Eglamour poked his head around the door.

Soft, white curtains diffused light across the bedroom where Benedick was resting. Photo by Slava.

“Come in, come in, old friend. Thank you for coming to see me,” Benedick said, inviting Eglamour to the chair near his bedside.

“Good to see some color in those cheeks, old man.” Eglamour shook Benedick’s hand before taking his seat.

“You old liar. I have never been paler in my life. With the days in the Fields long gone, the only sun I see is through the window of your beautiful glass over there. That is, when Imogen allows the curtains to be open.”

“You are lucky to have someone watching after you.” Eglamour looked at his hands folded in his lap.

“I take it Emilia has left already. She will serve the Globe well. You should be proud.”

“I shouldn’t have let her go. She could have waited a little longer. And now with the Polity, who knows what they will have the Brides do?” Eglamour let out a breath. It seemed as if he had been holding it in since he arrived.

“Don’t worry without reason. Come, tell me what happened with the Polity. What do they want?”

“They have come under the guise of peace, but they were sure to make their might known. They seek resources through our lands for the good of the Polity.”

“I would have never thought we would have seen this day during our lives.” Benedick coughed and closed his eyes in pain.

The sun is setting on the Westminster that was ours, Eglamour.

Eglamour reached for Benedick’s water glass and offered it to him.

Benedick took a sip. “Thank you, Eglamour.”

“Their captain will be going on tour through our cities to survey what the Globe has to offer the Polity. We must keep the peace to protect Westminster. Perhaps if we appease them with a portion of our goods, they will leave as quickly as they came.”

“I see. The sun is setting on the Westminster that was ours, Eglamour. Your sons are shaping up to be great heirs for the Smith, when you are ready to step back. My days are numbered, and I don’t think I properly prepared Imogen for what she will face when she takes over Wildcat Fields. Becoming the first woman to run Wildcat Fields in our city’s history is one thing, but now to do so under the eyes and demands of the Polity is something else entirely.”

“Imogen has already done an exceptional job with the crews in the Fields. She will serve Wildcat Fields and Westminster well. No matter the circumstances.”

“I do hope so, my friend.” Benedick reached for Eglamour’s hand. “Please look out for her when I’m gone. For me.”

“Of course. As if she was my own.”

“Of course. As if she was my own.”_Photo by Ricardo Moura.

“When are we to expect this captain to arrive in Westminster?” Benedick asked.

“They are supposed to send word shortly. I should start preparations.” Eglamour stood but kept a hold of Benedick’s hand for a moment longer.

“Yes, I must speak to Imogen so she can be ready. Thank you for your friendship all these years. We have made this city beautiful, haven’t we?”

“Benedick, don’t talk like that. I will be back soon. We will show the Polity our united city together.” Eglamour opened the door to leave.

“I hope it will be so. Farewell.”

Imogen appeared at the doorway, holding the door open for Eglamour.

“So long, dear friend. And goodbye, Imogen. I am sure we will see each other soon, as well.” Eglamour gave a nod to Imogen.

“Good to see you as always. Be well.” Imogen came into the room, carrying a small plate of food.

“Time for a bite to eat, Uncle. I hope Eglamour didn’t get you too riled up. You need your rest or else . . .”

“Thank you, my dear,” Benedick interrupted.

He was tired of Imogen reminding him of his declining condition. In the beginning, he hoped he could fight this illness and return to his beloved Fields. However, the days drew on, and it was evident that this was not a war he could win.

You are Wildcat Fields. You are its beauty, its mysteries, its life.

 “News from the meeting with the Polity is concerning, but it is nothing we cannot handle,” he continued. “We are Westies after all, aren’t we?” Benedick tried to smile, but he ended up looking more in pain than jovial.

“Don’t think I didn’t see you change the subject. I need you with all this Polity nonsense happening. Now eat. You need your strength.” Imogen set about tidying the already clean room around her.

Benedick watched as Imogen adjusted the curtains and straightened the few items on his dresser. Her graceful movements reminded him of his sister, Imogen’s mother. She had died when Imogen was only a child, and Benedick took care of Imogen ever since. They had grown inseparable, and Benedick’s mood grew sullen every time he thought about his limited future.

“Imogen, come. Sit.” He motioned to the chair beside him.

Dutifully, she obeyed and took his hand.

“My beautiful girl. I hoped I would live forever. You can see how well that has turned out.” He half-heartedly chuckled, which quickly turned into a fit of coughs.

Imogen handed him the glass of water and tried to bat away the tears that were starting to rim her eyes.

Imogen handed him the glass of water and tried to bat away the tears that were starting to rim her eyes. Photo by Manki Kim

“You have been doing wonderful in the Fields in my absence, but the time has come for me to turn over Wildcat Fields to you, officially. It needs a strong leader, especially with the Polity so close at hand.”

“Don’t talk like that. You have plenty of time.” Imogen’s cheeks burned with emotion.

“Neither one of us can deny this any longer. My days are numbered, and they are fewer than either one of us hoped. The captain of the Polity will be arriving soon to assess the city. I have little doubt she will want our oil. We must do what we can to appease the Polity while we protect our city. Our people.”

The tears were now silently streaming down Imogen’s cheeks.

“You are exactly what this city needs. Your compassion and strength will lead us and protect us. My heart tells me so.” Benedick wiped her face with a tender touch.

“I’m not ready for this, not without you.” Imogen looked down.

“You have been ready for years. I have taught you all that I can. You are Wildcat Fields. You are its beauty, its mysteries, its life. This is your time.” He lifted her chin.

Imogen’s lips slid into a small smile.

“I will do all I can to make you proud, Uncle.”

“I am prouder than you will ever know. I love you.”

Imogen leaned forward and wrapped Benedick in a warm hug. “I love you, too.”


“Has he come out of there yet?” Gonzalo paced in front of his father’s office door.

Sebastian leaned against the wall next to the door, picking at his fingernails. They had received a comm that Captain Ward was due to arrive the next day, but Eglamour locked himself in his office since returning from seeing Benedick.

“I’ll try again.” Sebastian knocked on the door, but they heard nothing. “Father, can you open the door? We need to finish the preparations for the Polity’s visit.”

They heard muffled noises, then nothing once again.

“We can’t wait forever!” Gonzalo whispered exasperatedly.

“Patience brother. This is better than we could have hoped. We will be able to handle the Polity visit ourselves, the way we want, since Father is . . . indisposed.”

“I like your thinking, Sebastian.”

“Trust me. We have to play this just right. The Polity is our best shot at putting those filthy Hallers in their place, for good. Westminster superiority will finally be recognized.”

“And when the Polity leaves, we will make sure they install us as the new leaders of the Globe.” Gonzalo’s eyes lit up.

“Now you’re getting it, Gonzalo. Go. I’ll take care of Father, and we will meet Captain Ward in the morning.”

They shook hands and Gonzalo disappeared down the stairs to the floor of the Smith. Sebastian slipped a key out of a hidden pocket. He unlocked Eglamour’s door and stepped inside.

The room was dark aside from the light filtering in from the gallery windows overlooking the Smith floor. Papers were strewn all over his father’s desk and floor. All the picture frames were placed face down and small glass ornaments lay toppled from their display stands. Eglamour slumped in his chair, staring blankly at the glowing furnaces below.

“Father, it’s me, Sebastian.” He stepped gingerly through the mess and switched on the side table lamp.

Eglamour winced at the bright light and blinked blindly toward Sebastian.

Eglamour winced at the bright light and blinked blindly toward Sebastian. Photo by Sunbeam Photography.

“Son, what are you doing here? Your mother will be worried you aren’t home yet.”

“Father, Mother has been gone for years now. Don’t you remember?”

Eglamour stared at his son for a moment and then turned back to the window. Sebastian examined the man before him. Eglamour’s gaunt face was covered in white stubble from lack of shaving. His proud shoulders now rolled forward, leaving him hunched and frail looking. Though Sebastian felt a pang of sadness over his father’s decline, he could not let that distract him from the task at hand.

 “It is time to come home, Father. Your work is done.” Sebastian rested a hand on Eglamour’s shoulder.

“I . . . I . . . I am waiting to hear from Emilia. She said she would send me a comm. I can’t miss it.” Eglamour shook off Sebastian’s hand and turned back to his desk. He began shuffling papers absentmindedly.

“Father, I am sure she is fine. You need your rest.”

“Perhaps you are right.” Eglamour started to rise out of his seat when a ping echoed in his office. “It’s her! I knew she would keep her promise!”

Eglamour pushed the papers around with renewed vigor, trying to find his small drone comm device. The messenger drone hovered outside his window, ready to relay the message to it. Sebastian easily found it under a picture of his sister. He handed it to his father and laid the picture back down on its face.

“Okay, are you happy now, Father? She is safe, and you can go home. Gonzalo and I will take care of everything.” Sebastian took his father by the shoulders and guided him toward the door.

Eglamour stopped short and dropped the comm device on the floor. He clasped his hands over his mouth and tears fell from his violet-flecked black eyes. Sebastian bent to retrieve the device and read:

Benedick died in his sleep early this morning. He is finally at peace, and he flies with Elizabeth Hathaway now. –Imogen

Sebastian cleared the message and stashed the device in his pocket.

“Let’s get you home where you belong.” Sebastian shut off the lamp and took his father home.


If you enjoyed Shanel’s story, please make sure and share some kind comments below. If you would like to see how this story began, read Shanel’s “Shadow of the Dunes,” which kicked off the Westminster stories in the Globe Folio series.

And make sure to check back Friday for Part 2 of “The Sands of Change” by Shanel Wilson. Part 2 brings Capt. Ward to the remote, desert city, and a deal is struck, setting new courses for Imogen, Sebastian, and Gonzalo.

Be stellar!

Matthew Cross

P.S. Now you can enjoy the Globe Folio from the beginning:

Act 1: Night of the Rocket

Act 2: Nights of Revelation

Be stellar!

Matthew Cross

Don’t miss Part 2 of “The Voice of Beasts”

In Part I, Lorenzo escapes Belmont, the city beneath the mountain, only to find a harsh, blinding landscape and dangerous beasts. Ros saves him from a Mirrim attack, and the two head for Whitehall, following the purple streaks across the sky . . .

The Voice of Beasts

Part II

by Frasier Armitage

Wind shrieked as it battered Lorenzo. He craned his neck over the hovercraft’s edge and squinted through his goggles. 

“This is the place,” he said. “This is where the lights end.” 

Ros brought the skiv to rest below the ridge of a swollen dune. Lorenzo scaled the sand and peered over its peak, with her at his side. 

Whitehall’s towers glittered in the distance. Between the dunes and Whitehall stood a hulking monster of metal. Painted green and brown, it loomed from the ground like a mountain in itself, its landing gear propping it on insect legs. 

It loomed from the ground like a mountain in itself, its landing gear propping it on insect legs. Photo by Lynn Kintziger.

It loomed from the ground like a mountain in itself, its landing gear propping it on insect legs.

“Could it be a Mirrim?” Lorenzo asked. 

Ros peered through an eyeglass she carried on a necklace. “I’ve never seen one so big.” 

“Where did it come from?” 

Ros pointed to the heavens. “Only one place something like that could’ve been made. From the stars. It looks like the ships they used to tell us about in old fishermen’s stories.” 

“What stories?” 

“On long sailing voyages, we told tales to pass the time. Warships came from the Polity and landed on a world, forcing our ancestors to flee across the sky to this one. I thought they were just fairy tales.” 

“People came in ships like that to seek a home?” 

Ros nodded. “Apparently.” 

Lorenzo smiled. “Then we are the same. That ship and I. For am I not in search of the same thing?” 

Ros frowned. “I don’t think Belmont and space are in quite the same league.” 

“What do you know of Belmont? What do you know of these newcomers?” 

“I know they dress a lot better than you. Here. Take a look.” 

Lorenzo clunked the eyeglass onto his goggles and peered through. Around the giant frame, people stood in uniform, holding guns. They carried the authority of the Council of Belmont. Had they worn robes and hoods instead of guns, he would have feared them. As he peered closer, his stomach tortured him in waves of doubt. 

These people seek a home. We are not so different. That is why the smoke of their trail has guided me to them. It has to be. 

“What’s that?” Ros yanked the eyeglass from him. 

A convoy of transports swept across the sand from the direction of Whitehall. 

“A Mirrim?” Lorenzo asked. 

“Nah. More likely a welcoming committee. Looks like we missed our shot.” 

Lorenzo’s eyes widened behind his goggles. “You were going to shoot them?” 

“No. Our shot at being the first to offer a trade. Those Whitehall goons will beat us to the punch. Come on. The best place for us now is the city. News travels fast. Let’s make sure we get it first.” 

Ros slid back down the dune. 

Lorenzo halted at the top. “Should we not warn them of the Mirrim?” 

“By the looks of it, they can take care of themselves.” She pointed her fingers in the shape of a gun and mouthed ‘pew pew pew’ as she gestured her index finger firing rounds. 

Lorenzo shook his head and scampered down the dune. 

Not everyone is looking to kill something. There are some beasts who seek only some shelter and a little shade. 

Lorenzo scampered down the dune. Photo by Fernando Paredes Murillo.

They approached the hover. Lorenzo halted, pulling at Ros’s elbow.

“How do we know that’s really your baby?” he asked. 

She tutted and unfurled her gun. From the top of its barrel, she removed a shaft that formed a piccolo, and blew a melody through it. The ode drifted through the breeze until its sound touched the hover. At the end of her tune, its horn blared the final notes. 

“That was beautiful,” Lorenzo said. 

Ros reconnected the instrument to her weapon and holstered it, hauling herself on deck. Lorenzo followed. 

She struck out across the sand for Whitehall. Lorenzo didn’t totter as the hover leapt over the dunes. 

“You learn fast,” she said. 

“We have a saying in Belmont. ‘When burned, only the fool keeps reaching for the fire.’ I will not be burned a second time, Ros.” 

She flicked the hover onto automatic and scooped some fruit from a cubby in the helm-panel. Her eyes never left Lorenzo as she reached into her boot, grabbed a knife, and sliced a chunk of fruit, placing it to her lips. “What’s it like in Belmont?” she asked. 

Lorenzo perched on the edge of the hull, his eyes returning to the distant mountain hidden by mist. “Have you ever seen a furnace blaze?” 

“Of course.” 

“How far does the smoke rise?” 

She licked her lips. “Depends. Sometimes on a still night, it feels like it scrapes the most distant stars.” 

Lorenzo nodded. “Imagine if that smoke filled all the air. Made it impossible to see these stars you speak of.” 

“You’d choke.” 

Belmont is a furnace, Ros. Photo by DDP.

“Belmont is a furnace, Ros. The air is smoke. They’ve built pillars dedicated to fire, believing it protects them. But the flames imprison them. They cannot see or breathe or taste anything but its bitterness. Belmont is blind, Ros. As blind as I am without these.” He pointed to his goggles. 

She sliced another lump of fruit and it slipped down her throat. “Sounds intense. I thought Newlondoners had it bad.” 

“Newlondoners?” 

“It’s where I’m from. Newlondon. The last city. We spend our lives on the water. The sea, the river, you name it.” 

He raised an eyebrow. “But you get to sail where you wish?” 

“Where others ask us to sail. Most of us are doomed to debt. We’re not a rich city. Not since pollium stopped washing up on shore. We don’t have the spires of Whitehall or the glass of Westminster to fall back on. So we sail where people tell us and hope that’ll be enough. You got family in Belmont?” 

“I do. And it would’ve grown had I stayed. They’d already matched me.” 

“Matched you?” 

“Chosen me a bride. And from a good family, too.” 

“You were gonna be married? Why didn’t you?” 

Lorenzo’s brows knitted into a web. “When it comes to my life, should I not have a voice?” 

“So you ran away?” 

Lorenzo stood. “I would rather die screaming than be forced to live without a voice. If I’d stayed, I’d have been no better than that Mirrim lying at the foot of the mountain.” 

Ros nodded. “What was her name? Your bride?” 

“Narissa.” 

“Pretty.” 

“There are prisons with pretty names, too.” 

She tossed him the other half of the fruit. He caught it, and she offered him the knife. 

“Eat up,” Ros said. “You don’t want to enter Whitehall on an empty stomach.” 


A line of yachts and barges snaked up and down the river, all the way to the city’s gates. The whole Globe had come to Whitehall, following the lights in the sky. 

Three Moons had circled the heavens and twilight had settled by the time Ros passed safely through the checkpoint along the road to Whitehall. 

“Come on,” she said, as they passed the city’s gate. “It’ll be quicker on foot.” 

She grabbed Lorenzo’s hand and dragged him through a maze of gleaming glass towers. Dusk played its swooning song in the fading auburn light. 

As night settled, a cavalry of bulbs lit up the city, twinkling brighter than the stars above. Crowds gathered in the restaurants and bars to sample Finsbury’s finest food. Whitehall was alive with expectation, a city brought to life by whispers of what might lie beyond its walls. 

“Let’s get a table,” Ros said. “It’ll be the best way of finding out what’s happening.” 

“How? By eating?” 

“By listening.” She winked, yanking him into a colonnade of restaurants where the diners collected outside, and a thousand voices mingled in a symphony. “Table for two,” she said to an automated waiter, who flashed her a holo of the empty seats, and she selected the ones closest to the biggest table. 

Whitehall was alive with expectation, a city brought to life by whispers of what might lie beyond its walls. Photo by Alexander Popov.

A white light glowed from the chairs, vanishing as they took their seats. 

“I’ll have a grilled skycrawler, medium rare, with a side of greens,” Ros said. “What about you?” 

“Same,” Lorenzo answered. 

“And two ales.” 

“Ales?” Lorenzo cocked his head. 

Ros licked her scarlet lips. “Trust me.” 

He shrugged. “Very well. Two ales for me as well.” 

She giggled. “No. Those two ales were for both of us. You know what? It doesn’t matter.” She dug into the pockets of her waistcoat and fed the credits into the mechanised server. The automaton slunk away, its gears humming. 

“We have nothing like this in Belmont,” Lorenzo said. “We eat with family.” 

“Family is important to you, huh?” 

“There is fire and family, and that is all. At least, that’s what my father told me. He would never have dreamed of a world where people ate together. He would’ve called them beasts and carnivores. He could be like that. Always so devoted.” 

“Not a bad quality to have in a father. Devotion.” 

“I tried to make him see. To open his eyes. But he wouldn’t listen.” 

“Listening is how we learn. Speaking of.” Ros raised a finger to her lips, and tipped back in her chair. She swept her sun-goldened curls behind her ear and tilted her head towards the cacophony of voices ringing from the table behind her. 

She tilted her head towards the cacophony of voices ringing from the table behind her. Photo by Nils Stahl.

Lorenzo did the same. 

“I heard,” a man’s voice said above the others, “that someone from each city has gone to meet with the Polity.” 

“It’s definitely a Polity ship then?” a woman chimed. 

“Didn’t you recognise it from the ancient texts? I always said those technical documents would come in handy,” another man blustered.

“Tosh and nonsense. You’ve been petitioning the libraries to burn those documents for years,” the woman said. 

The automaton interrupted Lorenzo’s eavesdropping with two plates of steaming food. 

Ros sat forwards and leaned into the aroma rising from the plate. “Smells good, right?” 

Lorenzo nodded. I’m not eating with these strangers. I’m eating with her. There’s a difference. 

He scooped up his utensils and copied Ros as she carved her skycrawler into bite-size morsels.  He picked at the charred breast of the skycrawler and inclined his ear to the conversation on the table behind. 

“Well, if it’s the Polity,” the woman said, “we shouldn’t be just sitting here waiting for them. We should take the initiative and attack.” 

“Attack?” the man questioned. 

“Absolutely. You know the Book of Shakespeare. The Polity are the reason we ended up on this world in the first place.” 

“You think they mean to subjugate us?” 

“Isn’t that what they did before?” she asked between mouthfuls of food. 

“How many of their ships could they have sent?” the man said. “But instead, they chose a single vessel.” 

“A rather large, single vessel, if you ask me. Don’t you think they were making a statement?” 

“What statement?” 

“I don’t know. How about ‘don’t mess with us if you want to live’? I tell you, if we don’t act now, they’ll disrupt the peace here.” 

Lorenzo shook his head, slamming his cutlery down and gulping his ale. 

“What is it?” Ros asked. 

“Those people behind us,” he said. “They’ve already sentenced the newcomers to death.” 

“They’re Whitehallers. If they had their way, everyone would be sentenced to death. You might want to take it steady with that ale.” 

He swigged the dregs of his first glass. The drink stung the back of his throat, but his head never felt so clear. “These people just want a home,” he shouted. “Anyone who can’t see that is as empty as a Mirrim.” 

He glugged on his second glass of ale. A hand tapped him on the shoulder. He turned to face the man from the table behind, his brown eyes swirling as Lorenzo tried to focus on them. 

“You might want to keep your voice down,” the man said. “Not everyone takes as kindly to the thought of the Polity as you do, friend.” 

Lorenzo wheeled on the man, swiping his hand away, losing his balance as he stood. “Listen, friend, I come from the mountain. They come from the sky. What’s the difference? If you want to kill them, you might as well be killing me.” 

“Lorenzo, sit down!” Ros glanced around as a hush settled among the diners. 

Lorenzo pressed his finger on the man’s chest. “You’re scared because they have a big ship and carry guns,” Lorenzo said. “Well, don’t you carry guns? I never saw a gun until today. But look!” Lorenzo pointed at the man’s hip, where he holstered an antique pistol. “You’re all killers.” 

“Is it a crime to protect ourselves?” the woman said. “We have to keep the peace somehow.” 

People who started shouting their mouth off might find themselves catching a blast. Photo by Daniel Stuben.

“Peace? You say you want peace, but you don’t want peace. You want control. There’s a difference.” 

“Sit down, Lorenzo!” Ros stood and reached out for him, but he shrugged her off. 

“You should listen to your lady, friend,” the man warned, and he tapped the pistol. “People who start shooting their mouth off might find themselves catching a blast.” 

Bloodflame flashed across Lorenzo’s eyes. He snatched at the man’s weapon and yanked it from its holster. A raging fire coursed through his veins. He wrapped his hands around the pistol and bent the barrel until it almost snapped in two. 

The man stepped back. “What are you?” he asked. 

“This is the only way to peace, friend,” Lorenzo said. “I’ve lived my whole life trapped inside a cage that others made for me. But no more.” 

As Lorenzo stepped forwards, people around him reached for their hips. 

Blue lightning flashed over the crowd.

“Should we not accept these newcomers with open arms?” Lorenzo called out. “They are the same as you. The same as me. Do not be poisoned by how tall your glass towers reach. No matter how high they seem, they are still just glass. Who will join me in welcoming the Polity? Where is your—” 

A shot rang out across the colonnade. Blue lightning flashed over the crowd. Ros snatched at the knife in her boot and hurled it at Lorenzo. Just before it struck his face, the path of the blast met with its metal, disintegrating it in a fizz of light. 

Lorenzo fell to the floor, gripping his goggles. The flash overwhelmed him. The sound of a tussle bombarded his ears. Pounding fists silenced grunts. Boots slammed into flesh. Glass crashed all around him, as the frenzied air whooshed past his face. 

His vision returned and he glimpsed a shadow darting in front of him. Then an explosion lit up the sky. Sparks rained down on the plaza of diners, before another boom signalled a hail of light. 

Ros knelt beside him, grabbed her piccolo and blew a tune into it. 

Then she stood and a flurry of air knocked Lorenzo back as a thunder of fists rocked the plaza even more than the explosions in the sky. 

Above him, a hover descended, its horn blaring. 

A hand grabbed Lorenzo and dragged him to his feet, forcing him up the rungs of the hover as eruptions overhead ignited the heavens. 

Lorenzo stumbled over his feet, and the hand pushed him behind the helm-panel, before flinging the hover through winding city streets. 

Drones pursued them, but Ros turned her pistol to them, and blue blasts swatted them out of the sky. 

“What was all that about?” Ros said. 

He raised his head. There wasn’t a scratch on her. “Ros, are you okay?” 

“I’m fine. Which is more than can be said for those Whitehallers.” 

“You saved me. Again.” 

“What can I say? I’m a glutton for punishment. Now are you gonna tell me what got you so riled up?” 

Another boom thundered overhead as sparks speckled the sky. 

“What is that?” He pointed up. 

“Just a little light show to celebrate the arrival of the Polity. Something I overheard at dinner.” 

“So much talk. So much hate. Why can’t people just accept one another?” Lorenzo shook his head. “My whole life, talk has kept me caged. I’m sick of it. I’d rather be in the company of Mirrims than listen to their babble.” 

Ros swept through the city gate and plunged into the darkness beyond. She eased off the throttle and switched it to automatic, turning to Lorenzo and running a hand across his cheek. “You don’t know what you’re saying. Come on, let’s get you sobered up,” she said. 

“No. Ros. I know exactly what I’m saying.” He took her hand in his. “Those people, they’re dangerous, Ros.” 

“Nothing I can’t handle.” 

“No. You don’t understand.” He gripped her hand. “I wish I could explain it. Thank you for saving me. For listening to me.” 

She smiled. “You really think the Polity are harmless, don’t you?” 

“I believe the only harm they bring is the hatred their presence stirs in the hearts of others.” 

She rose and pulled her pistol from her hilt. “Okay, Lorenzo. I believe you. But until we reach the river, I have to keep watch. There could be any number of beasts stalking us right now, and we wouldn’t hear them coming.” 

Lorenzo shook his head. “We’re safer here than back in that city.” 

“What do you mean?” 

He stared at the flashes of light raining down on Whitehall. “It’s not the beasts without a voice we should be worried about. It’s the creatures who speak which are most to be afeared.” 


If you enjoyed Frasier’s story, please make sure and share some kind comments below. If you would like to see how this story began, read Frasier’s “Pillars of Smoke,” which kicked off the entire Globe series and then Part 1 of “The Voice of Beasts.”

In two weeks, the next installment of Nights of Revelation will take us to the desert dunes of Westminster in Shanel Wilson’s “The Sands of Change.” As the leaders of the oil fields and the glassworks feel their grip on power slipping, the next generation begins its rise to power. And the Polity’s arrival on the Globe only quickens the flow in the hour glass.

Be stellar!

Matthew Cross

P.S. Now you can enjoy the Globe Folio from the beginning:

Act 1: Night of the Rocket

Act 2: Nights of Revelation

Be stellar!

Matthew Cross

At long last, we bring forth Nights of Revelation

On the Night of the Rocket, in the mountains of Belmont . . .

The Voice of Beasts

Part I

by Frasier Armitage

Purple streaked across the heavens as Lorenzo staggered over the mountain. Mist saturated his view, and a trail of violet blurred through vapor. He followed the light’s path as it burned above him, before it altered course and lowered as a distant speck. Then the lurid glare faded, but its afterglow still fell in shards of purple light, painting the sky. 

The glow drew him, pulling him towards a sanctuary of light. Its trail was a road stretching out above him, beckoning him away from the mountain. Rocks jutted from the ground in random clusters. The only road to follow was the one above him. 

He inched forwards, beginning his first reluctant steps away from Belmont, and the life he left behind. Each stride strengthened his resolve, and as the distance between Lorenzo and the city grew, so did the surety of his heart. 

Navigating a way down the rockface of the mountainside strained the muscles which the mines had nourished. His tendons stretched as he clambered down steep embankments and clawed his way across narrow ledges.

The ground levelled, and a causeway wound a path towards a faint amber shimmer which danced over a gate. Everybody knew about the Gatekeeper who kept watch over the mountain, but he’d never pictured the gate that led to Belmont until he saw it now. He shied away from where the bizarre haze shielded the entrance, and took the road leading down the mountainside. 

Dawn approached as Arrant Moon rose, reflecting the sun’s light. Day opened up to brighten the sky, and Lorenzo squinted through the onslaught of golden fire. His red eyes had never seen the sun. Twilight scorched his vision with disorienting intensity. He staggered as the world around him blurred in a blinding white. 

Mist thinned until it vanished, the last barrier between the raging sun and his innocent eyes. The sound of water trickled across the flatland. A tree’s shade gave him a moment’s relief, and a shadow emerged in the direction of the water. He tottered towards it, feet dragging him forwards as daybreak fractured the world around him.

“Hey!” he called to the distant shadow. He flapped his arms. “Hey!” 

The shadow sharpened as he neared it. A figure. They raised their hand and fixed a gun on Lorenzo. 

“Help!” he cried. 

The barrel of their pistol thundered as a bolt of blue plasma flashed. The shot brushed past his shoulder, whispering as it flew beyond him to strike a form behind. A body thudded to the ground. Lorenzo fell to his knees and turned to see a young man splayed lifeless. Plasma scorched his skin in burns and blotches. 

But at the sight of the man’s face, Lorenzo fell. He shivered, pointing at it, his jaw agape. Staring back at him was his own face. A perfect replica of his own body lay dead on the ground before him. 

Footsteps followed the shot, and the figure emerged from shadow. They holstered their gun and offered Lorenzo a hand. 

“That was close,” they said. “It almost had you.” They hoisted Lorenzo to his feet, their face a blur. 

“What almost had me?” Lorenzo asked. 

“It’s a Mirrim. A mirrorbeast. Deadliest creature in the savagelands. It’s a good job you yelled, otherwise you’d have been the one lying in a heap.” 

“That thing is a creature?” 

The figure nodded. “A nasty critter. The only thing they’re good for is target practice.” 

Lorenzo bowed. “Then I owe you my life.” 

“Pfft. Are you kiddin’? You gave me the chance to shoot a Mirrim. If anything, it’s me who owes you. Where are you heading to anyway?” 

Lorenzo shrugged. “I don’t know. I’m following the sky.” 

“Okay. That doesn’t sound crazy at all. Why don’t we start with where you’re heading from?” 

“I come from Belmont.” 

“Belmont? Is that a joke?” 

Lorenzo shook his head. “I swear it.” 

It’s a Mirrim. A mirrorbeast. Deadliest creature in the savagelands.

The figure leaned closer and peered into Lorenzo’s squinting red eyes. “Well, would you look at that? A real-life Belmontian. That explains the outfit at least, or lack of.” 

“What do you mean, outfit?” 

“Your clothes. Those rags barely cover you.” 

Lorenzo picked at the strands of fabric hanging loosely from his body. “We have no need of clothing when mist covers us.” 

The figure’s hands rested on their hips. “I don’t know the rules in Belmont. But if you hadn’t noticed, it’s not exactly misty today. Come on. I’ve got a spare set of clothes in my skiv you can use.” They turned and slunk into the distance where the sound of rushing water cascaded. 

Lorenzo tried to follow, staggering blindly. He waved his hands in front of him, shuffling across the plain.

“Are you okay?” they yelled. 

“The light,” Lorenzo said. “It’s so intense, I can barely see.”

They appeared at his side. “Here.” A pair of goggles was pressed into his hand, the lenses tinted dark as coal. “We use them for sailing into the sun.” 

He fixed them around his head and the light dimmed, softening everything into focus. The figure before him took shape. She smiled through thin lips, her yellow hair a mane of curls, and her startling blue eyes glistened like two hot flames. Clothing wrapped around her slender frame, hiding her body in oil-stained folds, and her waistcoat matched dark leather boots. 

“Better?” she asked. 

Lorenzo pirouetted to take in his surroundings. A river flowed not far from where they stood, and a machine that must’ve been her skiv hovered above the water. Behind him, across a flat plain, at the foot of the mountain where the mist clouded, lay the creature’s plasma-blistered body. 

“Where is the tree?” he asked. “The one that gave me shade so I could see you?” 

“The Mirrim was the tree,” she said. “It took a couple of seconds to shift from one form to another. That’s how it hunts. To match its prey, it becomes its prey.” 

Lorenzo shuddered. “Why did I not hear the creature approaching?” 

“That’s the one way to know if you’re dealing with a Mirrim or not. They make no sound. They can’t. Something about the way their skin changes means you’ll never hear them coming.” 

“But I heard it fall.” 

“Thanks to my plasma rounds.” She took her gun and kissed the barrel. “This baby’s never failed me yet.” 

Lorenzo frowned. “How does it work?” 

“The gun? You just point and shoot. What’s the matter? You never seen a gun before?” 

Lorenzo stared at the corpse, transfixed by how easily it could’ve been him. “What should we do with it?” 

“Let it rot. It’ll be a warning to passersby. Now are you coming, or not?” She raised an eyebrow and sauntered to the machine that floated above the water. 

Lorenzo followed her up the rungs of the craft, the cold metal tingling his fingers as he hauled himself onto the hover’s deck. 

She rooted through an old sack and tossed him some clothes. 

“Thank you,” he said. 

“No problem. You can pay me back later. The interest isn’t too steep.” She winked. 

Lorenzo frowned. “What do you mean ‘pay you back’?” 

She rolled her eyes. “Let me guess, you’re gonna try and tell me there’s no such thing as trade in Belmont, aren’t you? How gullible do you think I am?” 

“The fire feeds all.” 

“Not unless you feed it first. Everything’s a trade. See?” 

Lorenzo rubbed his chin. “I have nothing of value to give you.” 

“Not yet. But when word there’s a real-life Belmontian roaming around gets out, having you owe me a favor might come in handy, if you catch my drift.” 

Lorenzo fumbled the clothes over his tattered rags. “I can tell you my name, if that’s worth anything?” he offered. 

“Well someone’s got a high opinion of themselves, don’t they? Safe passage downriver and fresh clothes just to know your name. What are you? Royalty?” 

“What would you give me for my name?” 

“I’d trade like for like, if you’d accept those terms?” 

“Alright. I accept. I’m Lorenzo.” 

“Rosaline. But you can call me Ros.” 

“Ros? That’s a short name compared to my own. I’ll take these as compensation.” Lorenzo glanced at the clothes he wore, the leather jacket and canvas sailor’s trousers, tucked into thick boots. He straightened the goggles over his eyes. “How do I look?” 

“Like you still owe me, buster,” she said. 

Ros stood at the hover’s prow and worked the gears with the grace and skill of an artisan. Engines roared as she slung the skiv around, and shot off down the river. Lorenzo toppled onto the deck. Spray rushed up the side of the barge, splashing over him. 

Ros stifled a giggle into her sleeve. 

Lorenzo peered over the hull’s edge, wind whipping his hair back. He staggered on deck, the motion throwing him from side to side. “What manner of beast is this?” 

“It’s no beast. It’s my baby.” 

“You said that about your gun. Are all your babies so deadly?” 

Ros smiled. “Did you see those lights last night?” 

“I can still see them.” Lorenzo stared at the purple trail leading across the skies. 

“Really? I don’t see anything.” Ros shrugged. “Must be those pretty, red eyes of yours. What else can you see?” 

“I see you. And this baby of yours. The land. And the sky. And a purple trail leading that way.” 

“Towards Whitehall. It’s where we’re heading now.” 

“To follow the lights?” he asked. 

“Something like that. If you can see the afterburn, maybe your eyes would make a fair trade for those clothes.” 

Lorenzo backed away, his face aghast. “You can’t have my eyes. Or else how would I see? Is this what the world is like? Full of people swapping limbs for finery and fetishes?” 

“Pipe down, sailor. Your eyes can stay where they are. I just want you to show me the way. To the spot where they landed. That’s not too high a price to ask, is it?” 

Lorenzo puffed a breath of relief. “I accept your terms, Ros. For what reason do you seek the purple sparks?” 

She smiled. “Who knows what these newcomers might have to trade? Now, fair warning, this might get a little bumpy.” 

“Bumpy?” 

Ros slammed the hover over the riverbank. Its pads reverberated as the ground undulated below. Lorenzo’s legs wobbled, and he gripped the helm. 

Ros pushed him off the controls. “Keep those eyes peeled, Lorenzo. We’re heading into the savagelands. Quickest way to Whitehall. But Mirrims could be anywhere. Got it?” 

Lorenzo nodded. 

They passed over the wilds of the savagelands in silence. But silence was the mark of the Mirrims. Lorenzo wanted to speak just to prove that he was still himself, but Ros hushed him with a look. She stalked the horizon with a predatory gaze, her hand resting on the hilt of her gun. 

They passed rocks and the odd outcrop of grass, but could trust none of it. Not even the sand. Who could tell if a single grain was not a beast waiting for them, lurking? 

In the distance, another barge ploughed across the bedrock and dunes. Their silhouette warped in the sun’s heat. 

Ros nodded towards the craft. She placed a finger to her lips, and drew her gun. 

Lorenzo understood. 

The hover pulled alongside Ros, and she signalled with her arms to the captain of the barge, counting down from three, two, one. 

She blasted a horn. But no blast came from the hover beside her. 

It tilted to ram her and she fired a burst of plasma at the hull. Blue plasma burst like lightning across the hover as its metal shell writhed, morphing in and out of shape. The ship convulsed, and Ros fired again, before it collided with her hover, shunting it off course. Ros fell from the helm, and the gun clattered across the floor. Lorenzo toppled and when he rose, there were two of Ros on deck. He reached for the gun, and scooped it in his hands. 

“Lorenzo. It’s me.” There was only one voice, but both of them moved their lips. 

“Quiet,” he said. 

Sweat poured down his brow as he glanced from left to right. Which of them is Ros and which is the creature? 

“Lorenzo! It’s me! Use your ears!” 

“I said quiet.” They both stood by the helm. “I just point and shoot, right?” 

Both Rosalines nodded. 

“Okay. You.” He signalled to the one nearest the throttle. “Step forward.” 

They shuffled in front of the rudder, out of sight from the Ros that stood behind them. 

“Where do I come from? Both of you point on three.” Lorenzo said. “Three. Two. One.” 

The first Ros spun and pointed to the mountain in the distance. So did the Ros behind, at precisely the same moment. 

Lorenzo shook his head. His hands rattled on the pistol. “Change places. You go behind, and you in front” 

They swapped. 

“On three, I want you to point to your baby. Three. Two. One.” 

The Ros behind pointed one arm to the deck and her other arm at the gun he held, and the Ros in front frowned, pointing at their stomach. Lorenzo fired. The blast rippled over her body as plasma ignited her skin, charring her to a crisp. 

The remaining Ros picked up the Mirrim and flung it over the side of the craft. 

“Thanks,” she said. 

Lorenzo’s shoulders relaxed at the sound of her voice. “You said your baby never lets you down. Does this settle our debt?” 

She snatched the pistol from him and holstered it. “Keep your eyes peeled.” 

“We’re nearly there,” he said. “The purple sparks gather ahead.” 

Ros swung the hover in the direction Lorenzo pointed. They sped across the dunes, ever closer to discovering what manner of monster those lights had belonged to; ever nearer to where it lurked, waiting for them in the sand. 


If you enjoyed Frasier’s story, please make sure and share some kind comments below. If you would like to see how this story began, read Frasier’s “Pillars of Smoke,” which kicked off the entire Globe series.

And make sure to check back Friday for Part 2 of “The Voice of Beasts” by Frasier Armitage. Ranging from the harsh desert of the savagelands to the glass towers of Whitehall, Part 2 is filled with a race, a brawl, and a chase.

Finally, view the beautiful, original photos used to illustrate “The Voice of Beasts,” learn about the photographers, and follow links to their other work.

Be stellar!

Matthew Cross

P.S. Now you can enjoy the Globe Folio from the beginning:

Act 1: Night of the Rocket

Act 2: Nights of Revelation

Be stellar!

Matthew Cross